Six grand ideas to fight the end of antibiotics

The world is nearing a moment when antibiotics no longer work to treat infections. We are severely over-using the antibiotics we have – and that system is causing bacteria to evolve and develop resistance to the drugs intended to kill them.

Appropriately, the phenomenon is referred to as antibiotic resistance, and it’s shaped up to be one of the biggest challenges we face in the 21st Century.

A whole slew of governments, organisations, innovators, and scientists across the globe is pondering how to get us out of this mess. Here are just a few of the many methods being employed in the fight against antibiotic resistance.

  • USING BACTERIA AGAINST ITSELF
  • DEPLOYING TINY SEMICONDUCTORS
  • INFECTION-KILLING POLYMERS
  • GETTING OUT OF SILOES
  • BRIDGING ACADEMIA AND INDUSTRY
  • MAKING EXISTING ANTIBIOTICS STRONGER

Whether it’s stronger drugs, bacteria-shredding polymers, confoundingly small semiconductors, or something new entirely – it’s a promising sign that scientists are staying busy generating grand ideas to solve what could be humanity’s biggest health problem of the modern era.

David Weiss, PhD, director of the Antibiotic Resistance Center at Emory University, is mentioned in this story. He is a faculty member in the IMP and MMG programs.

Click here to view the full story in the BBC.