Sifting proteomes for copper nuggets

Just because scientists know the gene responsible for a rare disease doesn’t mean they know what’s going on. NGLY1 is a good example. A handful of children around the world have an inherited deficiency in NGLY1, leading to a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. A family diagnosed at Emory thought their older affected daughter had cerebral palsy for most of her childhood. How the loss of an enzyme that removes sugar tags from certain proteins causes problems is still being uncovered.

More broadly, geneticists can read a family’s DNA sequences and find the differences, but figuring out what they mean is still a challenge. That’s where the approach taken in a recent paper in Cell Systems, by Emory cell biologist Victor Faundez and colleagues at Illinois State, comes in.

His lab used a comparison of proteomes to dissect Menkes disease, a rare inherited deficiency in a copper transport enzyme called ATP7A. This means they didn’t compare genes; instead, they compared the proteins produced by patients’ cells with those in their unaffected relatives.

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